Muse India Award Winners



Muse India: the literary ejournal, (www.museindia.com) takes pleasure in announcing its annual National Literary Awards.   The awards for 2012 will be given on 18 Jan 2013 at the Hyderabad Literary Festival (18-20 Jan 2013; www.hyderabadliteraryfestival.com).  Instituted in 2011, the two awards are given (a) for an outstanding translation into English of a significant work in an Indian language, and (b) to a young writer, not yet 35, for a creative work in any literary genre. The winners are selected by a national jury of eminent scholars and writers, from the submissions received from authors and leading publishers. 

 

Muse India Translation Award 2012

Arunava Sinha's When the Time is Right (Penguin Books, 2011) a translation of Buddhadeva Bose’s 1949 Bangla novel Tithidore, set in the closing decades of British rule in India, has been selected for Muse India Translation Award 2012.  The Jury selected it unanimously for its ‘elegance and fluency’ and said Sinha “has captured the   storyteller’s free-flowing cadence, not common in translations of fiction”. The Jury cited Sinha’s translation as an example to be emulated by translators rendering classic prose texts from Indian literatures into English. 

 

Mustansir Dalvi’s translation of Muhammad Iqbal’s Shikwa and Jawaab-e Shikwa, as Taking Issue & Allah’s Answer (Penguin Books, 2012) was a close runner up.  The Jury commended it for its ‘bold attempt to render into contemporary cadences two poetic texts that stand at the source of a radical modernist movement within Islamic thought.’

 

Muse India Young Writer Award 2012

Meghna Pant’s debut novel One and a Half Wife (Westland, 2012) has been selected for the Muse India Young Writer Award 2012. The Jury considered it a serious achievement and said “Pant’s book not only handles the predicament of Indian migrants in the United States sensitively but is able to accomplish singular, individualized portrayals that make her characters stand out in the readers’ minds.”

 

A close runner up for this award was Sami Ahmad Khan’s Red Jihad (Rupa, 2012). Commending the work that “uses the narrative devices of a thriller,” the Jury said, “Ably working within the range of the plausible, Khan does well in debunking standard chauvinistic prejudices, and works against the grain of the pulp thriller while drawing on that genre’s architecture to achieve this purpose.”

 

Winners of the last year’s awards (2011) were Ranjit Hoskote (Translation Award) and Anindita Sengupta (Young Writer Award).

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